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The BC Government Will Permit Residential Skyscrapers With Up To 20 Storeys Close To Every SkyTrain Station & Up To 12 Storeys Close To Bus Interchanges

The BC government will permit residential skyscrapers with up to 20(FILEminimizer)

The BC Government Will Permit Residential Skyscrapers With Up To 20 Storeys Close To Every SkyTrain Station & Up To 12 Storeys Close To Bus Interchanges

20 Storeys Close To Every SkyTrain Station & Up To 12 Storeys Close To Bus Interchanges At a Glance

The Government of British Columbia has introduced new legislation to encourage high-density, transit-oriented development in the areas surrounding major transit hubs, including SkyTrain stations and bus exchanges. This move aims to combat the housing affordability and supply crisis by increasing residential density and ridership on public transit. The legislation requires municipal governments to allow minimum residential building heights of up to 20 storeys within 200 meters of a SkyTrain station, with lower heights permitted at greater distances.

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The legislation also establishes minimum floor area ratio (FAR) density requirements, with higher FARs closer to transit hubs. Municipalities must change their policies for transit-oriented development areas by June 30, 2024, and are encouraged to approve higher densities and heights. Additionally, the legislation eliminates minimum vehicle parking requirements within these areas to reduce construction costs, speed up development, and promote public transit ridership. The government expects this legislation to result in around 100,000 new homes near transit hubs over the next decade.

The Details of Up To 20 Storeys Close To Every SkyTrain Station & Up To 12 Storeys Close To Bus Interchanges

New legislation has been introduced in British Columbia to promote high-density, transit-oriented development. The Government of BC aims to increase residential density around major transit hubs, specifically SkyTrain stations and bus exchanges. This move is intended to address the housing affordability and supply crisis, as well as boost ridership on TransLink and BC Transit.

There are exceptions to the new regulations, which will only apply to residential or mixed-use residential land uses. Commercial, agricultural, and industrial land uses, as well as First Nations reserve lands and airports, are not included. The specifics of these policies were previously unknown but have now been clarified.

For SkyTrain stations in Metro Vancouver, municipalities will be required to allow minimum residential building heights of up to 20 storeys within 200 meters of a station, up to 12 storeys between 201 and 400 meters from a station, and up to eight storeys between 401 meters and 800 meters from a station.

The number of new homes that can be built near these transit hubs will also be determined by the floor area ratio (FAR) density, which is the calculation of a building’s total floor area in relation to the land it covers.

The minimum FAR will vary depending on the distance from the SkyTrain station, with a minimum FAR of 5. for distances up to 200 meters, 4. for distances between 201 and 400 meters, and 3. for distances between 401 meters and 800 meters.

Similar rules will apply to areas near bus exchanges in Metro Vancouver, Greater Victoria, and Kelowna, with slightly lower minimum FAR density requirements.

Municipalities will be required to change their policies for these areas by June 30, 2024, but can choose to approve higher densities and building heights if they meet the minimum requirements set by the provincial government. The legislation also eliminates minimum vehicle parking requirements within these transit-oriented development areas to lower construction costs, speed up construction, reduce emissions, and encourage public transit usage.

Municipalities can now determine the amount of residential vehicle parking needed based on demand. The provincial government anticipates that around 100 transit-oriented development areas will be designated by approximately 30 cities across BC in the first year of the new legislation, potentially resulting in the construction of 100,000 new homes near transit hubs over the next decade.

This legislation is seen as a way to make housing projects financially viable for builders and non-profit developers by offsetting high land costs. It will also support TransLink and the provincial government’s plans to develop under-utilized properties and acquired lands near public transit.

The legislation aligns with the provincial government’s efforts to meet new housing supply targets by providing municipalities with specific deadlines to change their policies and streamline the rezoning process. Overall, these measures aim to promote the development of affordable and connected communities while leveraging public lands for housing.

The BC government will permit residential skyscrapers with up to 20(FILEminimizer)

Wrap Up

New legislation has been introduced by the British Columbian government to permit high-density, transit-oriented development in the vicinity of major transit hubs, including bus exchanges and SkyTrain stations. The minimum residential building heights that local governments permit will be up to 20 storeys for locations that are 200 meters or less from a station, 12 storeys for locations that are 201 to 400 meters from a station, and 8 storeys for locations that are 401 to 800 meters away from a station. With more people using TransLink and BC Transit, the bill seeks to address the affordability and supply issues in housing. Within the first year of the new law’s implementation, the provincial government anticipates that about 100 transit-oriented development areas surrounding transit hubs will be designated in about 30 cities throughout British Columbia.

The provincial government in British Columbia has introduced legislation to encourage transit-oriented development, which could lead to the construction of up to 100,000 new homes near transport hubs over the next 10 years. Municipalities will be required to meet minimum standards set by the government, but will be able to approve higher densities and building heights at their discretion. The legislation is expected to make projects financially viable for builders and non-profit developers, while also supporting TransLink’s real estate development division and the government’s $400m strategy of buying land next to public transport for housing.

The BC Government Will Permit Residential Skyscrapers With Up To 20 Storeys Close To Every SkyTrain Station & Up To 12 Storeys Close To Bus Interchanges Chinese version

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